Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: ROADS

Date: 1300-1400
Language: French
Origin: exprès, from Latin expressus, past participle of exprimere 'to press out', from premere 'to press'; the idea of 'speed' comes from trains stopping only at specific places, so the complete journey takes less time

express

2 adjective
     
express2 [only before noun]
1 deliberate and for a specific situation:
The school was founded with the express purpose of teaching deaf children.
2 clear and definite
express agreement/consent/authority etc
He is not to leave without my express permission.
Matthew left express instructions to keep all doors locked.
3

express train/coach/bus

TTCTTT a train or bus that does not stop at many places and can therefore travel more quickly
4

express post/mail

TCM a system that delivers letters and packages very quickly
5 American English designed to help you move through a place more quickly:
express lanes on the freeway
an express line at a supermarket (=where people with only a few things to buy go to pay)
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