Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: SPACE

Language: Old English
Origin: flyht

flight

noun
     
flight S3 W2
1TTATTS

travel

[countable] a journey in a plane or space vehicle, or the plane or vehicle that is making the journeyCOLLOCATIONS COLLOCATIONS
book a flight catch a flight (=get on a plane to go somewhere) miss a flight (=arrive too late to get on a plane) cancel a flight a long/short flight a domestic flight (=to another place in the same country) an international flight (=to another country) a non-stop/direct flight a connecting flight (=a flight to continue a journey, after a previous flight)
He immediately booked a flight to Toulouse.
Bernstein caught the first flight out of Washington.
We need to hurry or we'll miss our flight.
All flights out of Chicago were cancelled.
Many people have trouble sleeping after a long flight.
a short flight in a hot air balloon
Soon smoking will be banned on all domestic flights.
The number of international flights fell last year.
non-stop flights from London to Tehran
We only had 20 minutes to make our connecting flight.
2HBBTTA

flying

[uncountable] when something flies through the air
in flight
pelicans in flight
In 1968, the first supersonic airliner took flight (=began flying).
3

movement through air

[uncountable] an object's or bird's movement through the air:
During its flight, the weapon twists and turns.
4TBB

stairs

[countable] a set of stairs between one floor and the next:
Bert lives two flights down from here.
a flight of stairs/steps
She fell down a whole flight of stairs.
5

escape

[uncountable] when you leave a place in order to try and escape from a person or a dangerous situation
flight from
Donald Wood's hasty flight from South Africa early in 1978
take flight also take to flight British English
When the alarm sounded, the whole gang took flight.
put somebody to flight (=make someone run away especially by fighting or threatening them)
6

flight of fancy/imagination/fantasy

thoughts, ideas etc that are full of imagination but that are not practical or sensible
7HBB

birds

[countable] a group of birds all flying together
flight of
a flight of swallows
in-flight, top-flightWORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

travel, travelling, journey, trip, voyage, crossing, flight
Travel (uncountable noun) and travelling are used to mean the general activity of moving from place to place Air travel is becoming cheaper. Her work involves a lot of travelling.!! You do not say 'a travel'.Use journey to talk about travelling a long distance or travelling regularly, when the emphasis is on the travelling itself a long and difficult journey (NOT travel) through the mountains I read during the train journey to work. Did you have a good journey? (=Were you comfortable, was the train on time etc?)A trip is when you go on a short journey, or a journey you do not usually make, and come back again. Use this when the emphasis is on where you are going or why you are going there my first trip to the States a business trip Was it a good trip? (=Did you achieve what you wanted to or have a good time there?)Voyage is used for a long sea journey a voyage across the oceanCrossing is used for a fairly short sea journey The crossing takes 90 minutes.Flight is used for a journey by air Have a good flight!See also travel
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