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Topic: SPORT


cap

2 verb
     
cap2 past tense and past participle capped, present participle capping [transitive]
1

cover

be capped with something

to have a particular substance on top:
a graceful tower capped with a golden dome
magnificent cliffs capped by lovely wild flowers
2

limit

[often passive] to limit the amount of something, especially money, that can be used, allowed, or spent:
the only county to have its spending capped by the government
3

good/bad

to say, do, or be something that is better, worse, or more extreme than something that has just happened or been said:
Well, we went three nights with no sleep at all. I bet you can't cap that!
4

be capped by something

to have something very good or very bad at the end of an event:
a fabulous weekend, capped by dinner in the Times Square Hotel
5

sport

[usually passive] British EnglishDS to choose someone for a national sports team:
He's been capped three times for England.
6

to cap it all (off)

British English spoken used before a statement to say that something is the last in a series of annoying, unpleasant, or funny events:
To cap it all, the phones didn't work, and there was no hot water.
7

snow-capped, white-capped etc

with snow on top, with white on top etc:
snow-capped mountains
8

tooth

to cover a tooth with a special hard white substance:
He's had his teeth capped.
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