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Topic: SPORT


chip

2 verb
     
chip2 past tense and past participle chipped, present participle chipping
1

accidentally break (something)

[intransitive and transitive] if you chip something, or if it chips, a small piece of it breaks off accidentally:
Gary fell and chipped one of his front teeth.
He chipped a bone in his knee and was carried off the pitch.
These plates chip really easily.
chip off
The paint had chipped off the gate.
2

remove something

[intransitive,transitive always + adverb/preposition] to remove something, especially something hard that is covering a surface, by hitting it with a tool so that small pieces break off:
Archaeologists were carefully chipping away at the rock.
Chip out the plaster with a steel chisel.
3

sport

[transitive]DS to hit a golf ball or kick a football or a rugby ball so that it goes high into the air for a short distance:
United scored just before half-time when Adcock cleverly chipped the ball over the keeper.
4

potatoes

[transitive] British EnglishDFC to cut potatoes into thin pieces ready to be cooked in hot oil

chip away at something

phrasal verb
to gradually make something less effective or destroy it:
Writers such as Voltaire and Diderot were chipping away at the foundations of society.
Fears about the future chipped away at her sense of well-being.

chip in

phrasal verb
1 to interrupt a conversation by saying something that adds more detail
chip in with
Other committee members chipped in with suggestions.
'It won't be easy,' Jeff chipped in.
I'd just like to chip in, Bill, if I might.
2 if each person in a group chips in, they each give a small amount of money so that they can buy something together:
We all chipped in to buy Amy a graduation present.
chip in (with) something
52 people in the music industry each chipped in $250 apiece.
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