Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: TENNIS

Date: 1600-1700
Origin: Perhaps from smack + mash

smash

1 verb
     
smash
smash1
1 [intransitive and transitive] to break into pieces violently or noisily, or to make something do this by dropping, throwing, or hitting it:
Vandals had smashed all the windows.
Firemen had to smash the lock to get in.
Several cups fell to the floor and smashed to pieces.
2 [intransitive,transitive always + adverb/preposition] to hit an object or surface violently, or to make something do this:
A stolen car smashed into the bus.
He smashed his fist down on the table.
3

smash a record

to do something much faster, better etc than anyone has done before:
The film smashed all box office records.
4 [transitive] to destroy something such as a political system or criminal organization:
Police say they have smashed a major crime ring.
5 [transitive]DST to hit a high ball with a strong downward action, in tennis or similar games

smash something ↔ down

phrasal verb
to hit a door, wall etc violently so that it falls to the ground

smash something ↔ in

phrasal verb
to hit something so violently that you break it and make a hole in it:
The door had been smashed in.
smash somebody's face/head in (=hit someone hard in the face or head)
I'll smash his head in if he comes here again!

smash something ↔ up

phrasal verb
to deliberately destroy something by hitting it:
Hooligans started smashing the place up.
WORD FOCUS: break WORD FOCUS: break
smash with a lot of force
shatter
into many pieces
split
into two pieces
snap
into two pieces, with a sudden loud noise
tear
paper/cloth
burst
pipe/tyre/balloon
crumble
break into a lot of small pieces
disintegrate
break into a lot of small pieces and be destroyed
fracture
if a bone fractures or you fracture it, it breaks slightly so that a small line appears on the surface


See also
break
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