English version

change in Transport topic

changechange2 ●●● S1 W1 noun πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 things becoming different [countable, uncountable]CHANGE/BECOME DIFFERENT the process or result of something or someone becoming different πŸ”Š I find it hard to cope with change. πŸ”Š scientists worried about climatic changechange in πŸ”Š changes in the immigration laws πŸ”Š A change in personality may mean your teenager has a drug problem.change of πŸ”Š a change of temperature πŸ”Š No major changes were made to the book.change for the better/worse (=a change that makes a situation better or worse) πŸ”Š There was a change for the better in the patient’s condition.social/political/economic etc change πŸ”Š the sweeping political changes after the fall of communism πŸ”Š She had a change of heart (=change in attitude) and decided to stay. πŸ”Š Family life has undergone dramatic change in recent years.2 from one thing to another [countable]CHANGE FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER the fact of one thing or person being replaced by another πŸ”Š The car needs an oil change.change of πŸ”Š a change of government πŸ”Š a change of addresschange from something to something πŸ”Š the gradual change from grasslands to true desert πŸ”Š The government has made some major policy changes.3 pleasant new situation [singular]DIFFERENT a situation or experience that is different from what happened before, and is usually interesting or enjoyablechange from πŸ”Š The morning was cool; a welcome change from the heat of the day before.for a change πŸ”Š How about dinner out for a change?it/that makes a change (=used to say that something is better than and different from usual) πŸ”Š β€˜Ron’s buying the drinks.’ β€˜That makes a change.’change of scene/air/pace etc (=when you go to a different place or do something different) πŸ”Š The patients benefit greatly from a change of scenery.a change is as good as a rest (=used to say that starting to do something different is as good as having a rest)4 money [uncountable] a) MONEYthe money that you get back when you have paid for something with more money than it costs πŸ”Š Here’s your change, sir. b) money in the form of coins, not paper moneyin change πŸ”Š I have about a dollar in change. πŸ”Š Matt emptied the loose change from his pockets. πŸ”Š A beggar asked for some spare change (=coins that you do not need). c) coins or paper money that you give in exchange for the same amount of money in a larger unitchange for Β£1/$10 πŸ”Š Excuse me, have you got change for a pound?make change American English (=give someone change) πŸ”Š Can you make change for $20?β–Ί see thesaurus at money5 β†’ small change6 β†’ change of clothes/underwear etc7 train/bus/aircraft [countable]TT a situation in which you get off one train, bus, or aircraft and get on another in order to continue your journey πŸ”Š Even with a change of trains, the subway is quicker than a cab at rush hour.8 β†’ get no change out of somebody β†’ ring the changes at ring2(6)COLLOCATIONSadjectivesbig/majorGoing to a new school is a big change for children.slight/small/minorThe proposed changes were relatively minor.gradualThere has been a gradual change in the weather.dramatic/drastic/radical (=very big, especially in way that is surprising)The Industrial Revolution was a period of dramatic change.significantThe change in blood pressure was not significant.marked (=very noticeable)There was a marked change in his behaviour.fundamentalReducing waste requires a fundamental change in attitude.social/political/economic etc changeDemands for political and social change are growing.sweeping changes (=affecting many things or people, especially because of an official decision)There are likely to be sweeping changes in the company.far-reaching changes (=important and having a great effect that will last a long time)The Internet has brought about far-reaching changes in the way we work.verbsmake a changeWe've had to make some changes to the design. introduce a changeA number of changes were introduced to the curriculum.bring (about) change (also effect a change formal) (=cause change)The war brought about radical social change.Treatment is aimed at effecting a change in the child’s negative behaviour.see/notice/observe a change I saw a big change in her when I met her again.undergo a change (=be affected by a change)The body undergoes a number of changes during this time.signal a change (=be a sign of a change)Does this move signal a change in US foreign policy?phrasesthe pace/rate of changePeople sometimes feel alarmed by the pace of technological change.THESAURUSchange noun [countable, uncountable] a situation in which someone or something becomes different, or the act of making something differentThere was a sudden change in the weather.We are living in a period of great change.He was told to make some slight changes to his essay.alteration noun [countable, uncountable] a change, especially a small one that happens naturally or gradually, or one that is made in order to improve somethingI noticed a slight alteration in her behaviour.They had to make some alterations to their original theory. reform noun [countable, uncountable] a change made to a system or law in order to improve itHe called for a reform of our outdated voting system.Many people opposed the economic reforms.shift noun [countable] a change, especially in people’s attitudes or in the way they do things, or in the position of someone or somethinga shift in public opinion about the warThere has been a noticeable shift in government policy on education. There needs to be a major shift away from road transport to rail transport.After he died, there was a dramatic shift in the balance of power.swing a big change, especially in someone’s opinions or moodsThere has been a big swing toward the Democrats (=many more people are supporting them).The drug can cause mood swings.fluctuation noun [countable, uncountable] a change in something – used when something changes oftenfluctuations in the value of the dollartemperature fluctuationsfluctuations in his moodThere has been some fluctuation in productivity levels.a great changetransformation noun [countable, uncountable] a change in which something or someone becomes completely differentThere has been a complete transformation in his attitude since he became a father.her transformation from shy local girl to famous movie actressrevolution noun [countable] a complete change in ways of thinking or workingThe 1970s saw the beginnings of a new technological revolution.Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity started a revolution in scientific thinking.shake-up noun [countable] a situation in which a lot of changes are very quickly made in a system or organization in order to make it more effectiveThe department has not performed well and is badly in need of a shake-up.The Administration is planning a thorough shake-up of the welfare system.U-turn noun [countable] a complete change in the plans of a government or political party so that it decides to do the opposite of what it originally said it would doThe government was forced to do a U-turn after angry protests about their taxation policy.
Examples from the Corpus
changeβ€’ If you are thinking about a change to a different part of the country you will need to use your vacation to look for accommodation.β€’ The delay was the result of a change in the way that we administer the grants.β€’ For most ordinary workers, the new tax laws represent a change for the worse.β€’ Two events occurred that ensured, for the time being at least, no such a change in Congressional attitudes would occur.β€’ Many people find it hard to accept change.β€’ He hates all changes to his routine.β€’ The police must be notified of any change of address.β€’ The computers will record any changes to the system.β€’ After a number of career changes, she settled into a job with a major bank.β€’ Does anyone have change for a five dollar bill?β€’ I've got a Β£10 note and about Β£5 in change.β€’ I've got Β£20 and a bit of loose change as well.β€’ Labor Secretary Lynn Martin recommended major changes in the management operations of the company.β€’ I expect to see major changes until it is ten years old.β€’ Volatility increased, and the extent as well as the direction of change became less predictable.β€’ A lot of people are frightened of change.β€’ 1989 was a year of great political change in eastern Europe.β€’ These spectacles are in fact subject to relentless change.β€’ I hope you've got some change for the bus, because I haven't.β€’ Some changes have already been introduced into schools.β€’ The movie pivots on not one but two such changes, and the result is exhaustingly cathartic, ultimately uplifting.β€’ French people were asked how they felt about the change from the franc to the Euro.β€’ I can't get used to all these changes.β€’ House plants are often sensitive to changes in temperature.β€’ Excuse me, I think you've given me the wrong change.β€’ Here is your change, sir.change inβ€’ Changes in diet can reduce the occurrence of some cancers.β€’ A change in personality can mean your teenager has a drug problem.change from something to somethingβ€’ The abrupt change from legacy to trust is very striking.β€’ The mean period is 331 days, but both the period and the amplitude change from one cycle to another.β€’ The curriculum, which at one time had seemed novel, barely changed from decade to decade.β€’ It is a time-phase between childhood and adulthood and a process of changing from a pupil to an independent working adult.β€’ Nevada City is in process of changing from old to new.β€’ The performers changed from summer to summer, but the scene remained the same over many decades.β€’ She felt light-headed and it was not just the swift change from lying down to standing.β€’ Why that change from symmetrical expansion to uneven ejection took place is a mystery, Bond said.change fromβ€’ Living in Iowa is certainly a big change from Florida.in changeβ€’ The clerk handed him $3 in change.