Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Topic: TRANSPORT

Sense: 1,4
Date: 1900-2000
Origin: stall 'to put in a stall' (14-20 centuries), from STALL1
Sense: 2-3
Date: 1800-1900
Origin: stale 'something that leads people from the correct way' (15-19 centuries), from Anglo-French estale 'something set up'

stall

2 verb
     
stall2
1 [intransitive and transitive]TT if an engine or vehicle stalls, or if you stall it, it stops because there is not enough power or speed to keep it going:
The car kept stalling.
An inexperienced pilot may easily stall a plane.
2 [intransitive] informal to deliberately delay because you are not ready to do something, answer questions etc:
Quit stalling and answer my question!
He was just stalling for time.
3 [transitive] informal to make someone wait or stop something from happening until you are ready:
Maybe we can stall the sale until the prices go up.
We've got to stall him somehow.
4 [intransitive] to stop making progress or developing:
The peace process remained stalled.
While his career has stalled, hers has taken off.
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