English version

aback

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishabacka‧back /əˈbæk/ adverb   be taken aback (by something)
Examples from the Corpus
abackHe was momentarily a bit taken aback.The singer is capable of delicacy, as well; the occasional pianissimo utterance takes you aback.The authorities were taken aback, and took the unprecedented step of cordoning off the painting.She appeared taken aback, as if she had only just realised that the pair of them were not alone.They all looked suitably taken aback by his entrance, muttering disapproval whilst he insisted that Ockleton step outside.Intel was taken aback by the intensity of public anger.Though she did seem taken aback, come to think of it.He seemed even more taken aback than I was, and this heartened me.
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