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Date: 1400-1500
Origin: Partly from Old French aboter 'to share a border with', from bout 'act of hitting, end', from boter 'to hit'; partly from Old French abuter 'to come to an end', from but 'end, aim'

abut

verb
     
a‧but also abut on past tense and past participle abutted, present participle abutting [transitive] formal
if one piece of land or a building abuts another, it is next to it or touches one side of it

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