Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1300-1400
Language: French
Origin: accepter, from Latin acceptare, from accipere 'to receive', from ad- 'to' + capere 'to take'

accept

verb
     
ac‧cept S1 W1
1

gift/offer/invitation

[intransitive and transitive] to take something that someone offers you, or to agree to do something that someone asks you to do [≠ refuse]:
Rick accepted her offer of coffee.
He accepted the invitation to stay with us.
His school reports said that he is always ready to accept a challenge (=agree to do something difficult).
Please accept this small gift.
They offered me a job and I accepted.
accept something from somebody
He accepted a glass of water from Helen.
He readily accepted her invitation (=accepted it quickly).
2

situation/problem etc

[transitive] to decide that there is nothing you can do to change a difficult and unpleasant situation or fact and continue with your normal life:
He's not going to change, and you just have to accept it.
accept that
We have to accept that this is not an ideal world.
You need to accept the fact that most of your problems are caused by jealousy.
3

think somebody/something is good enough

[transitive] to decide that someone has the necessary skill or intelligence for a particular job, course etc or that a piece of work is good enough [≠ reject]:
Students accepted by Stanford Law School had very high scores on the LSAT.
accept somebody/something as something
They have accepted him as the representative of the company.
accept somebody/something for something
Random House accepted the book for publication.
4

become part of a group

[transitive] to allow someone to become part of a group, society, or organization, and to treat them in the same way as the other members [≠ reject]
accept somebody as something
The children gradually began to accept her as one of the family.
accept somebody into something
It often takes years for immigrants to be accepted into the host community.
5

agree to take/deal with something

[transitive] to agree to take or deal with something that someone gives you, or to say that it is suitable or good enough:
The government has accepted the resignation of a senior army commander.
Please accept my sincere apologies.
Sorry, we don't accept travellers' cheques.
6

suggestion/advice

[transitive] to decide to do what someone advises or suggests you should do:
Be prepared to accept the advice of members of staff.
7

believe an explanation/statement

[transitive] to agree that what someone says is right or true [≠ reject]:
She has accepted your explanation as to why you didn't attend the meeting.
8

accept responsibility/blame for something

to admit that you were responsible for something bad that happened:
The University will not accept responsibility for items lost or stolen.

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