English version

accolade

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishaccoladeac‧co‧lade /ˈækəleɪd/ noun [countable]  PRAISEpraise for someone who is greatly admired, or a prize given to them for their workultimate/highest/supreme etc accolade She received a Grammy Award, the highest accolade in the music business.
Examples from the Corpus
accoladeDale received all the attention and accolades, and Link settled for a few extra bucks on his royalty checks.Indeed, as some traditionalists complained, the more outrageous the art, the more likely the critical accolade.There is not greater accolade than that.Cole grants them a grudging accolade.She received a Grammy Award, the highest accolade in the music business.As star producers they were used to receiving public accolades and acknowledgment of their achievements.But, in truth, he is the one management thinker who genuinely deserves the accolade.Britain's role in the Berlin air-lift earned her the accolade of a staunch and like-minded ally.He probably accepts that the ultimate accolade for the county cricketer will now remain inaccessible.Already, the program has won accolades for bringing investment to poor neighborhoods of Knoxville.ultimate/highest/supreme etc accoladeAll the gardens have been chosen by local inspectors, and 80 have been awarded the highest accolade of a two-star rating.He probably accepts that the ultimate accolade for the county cricketer will now remain inaccessible.
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