Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1400-1500
Language: Old French
Origin: acompaignier, from compaing 'companion', from Late Latin companio; COMPANION

accompany

verb
     
Related topics: Music
ac‧com‧pa‧ny W2 past tense and past participle accompanied, present participle accompanying, third person singular accompanies [transitive]
1 to go somewhere with someone:
Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult.
Wherever her husband went, she would accompany him.
! In spoken English, it is more usual to use go/come with He came with me to the airport.
2APM to play a musical instrument while someone sings a song or plays the main tune:
Daniel wanted Liz to accompany him on violin.
3 [usually passive] to happen or exist at the same time as something else:
The disease is accompanied by sneezing and fever.
4 if a book, document etc accompanies something, it comes with it:
Please see accompanying booklet for instructions.
Your passport application form should be accompanied by two recent photographs.

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