Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: French
Origin: ajuster, from juste 'exact, just'

adjust

verb
     
ad‧just W3
1 [intransitive and transitive] to gradually become familiar with a new situation [= adapt]:
They'll soon settle in - kids are very good at adjusting.
adjust to
It took a few seconds for her eyes to adjust to the darkness.
adjust to doing something
My parents had trouble adjusting to living in an apartment.
adjust yourself to something
It took time to adjust myself to motherhood.
2 [transitive] to change or move something slightly to improve it or make it more suitable for a particular purpose:
Check and adjust the brakes regularly.
Taste the soup and adjust the seasoning.
If your employment status changes, your tax code will be adjusted accordingly.
3 [transitive] if you adjust something you are wearing, you move it slightly so that it is neater, more comfortable etc:
He paused to adjust his spectacles.
well-adjustedWORD FOCUS: change WORD FOCUS: change
to change something: alter, adapt, adjust, amend, modify, revise, vary

to change a system or organization: restructure, reorganize, reform

to change something completely: transform, revolutionize

to change facts or information, or change what someone has said: twist, distort, misrepresent

easily changed: flexible, adaptable

impossible to change: fixed, final, irrevocable


See also
change

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