English version

afoot

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishafoota‧foot /əˈfʊt/ adjective [not before noun] 🔊 🔊 PLANbeing planned or happeningmoves/plans/changes afoot 🔊 There were plans afoot for a second attack.afoot adverb
Examples from the Corpus
afootA quick look round the research and development facility in Versailles revealed a number of interesting software projects afoot.Tammuz was immediately suspicious because he knew the man never broke his routines unless something out of the ordinary was afoot.From information received, it was thought that some illegal activity was afoot.There were plans afoot for a second attack.Plans are now afoot for an important exhibition of Canaletto in England.Great plans are afoot to ban smoking in public places, resulting in smokers soon becoming complete outcasts in society.Apparently, moves are afoot to ban smoking in public places.Now moves are afoot to mend the situation.But plans are afoot to raise more cash from new programme sales.However, there are plans afoot to see if tutoring in primary schools has any effect on performance later on.Plans are also afoot to transform the disused salt mines of Saxony and Thuringia into depositories for toxic waste.moves/plans/changes afootThere are also some changes afoot.There were in consequence substantial changes afoot.Are there plans afoot, even now, for the entire team to prance off backwards?Radio sounds like music to City ears: Changes afoot in the world of radio have made the City sit up.At the moment, they face fines of £400, but there are moves afoot to introduce stiffer penalties.However, there are plans afoot to see if tutoring in primary schools has any effect on performance later on.There were changes afoot, too, in their lives.
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