Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

all

1 determiner, predeterminer, pronoun
     
all1 S1 W1
1 the whole of an amount, thing, or type of thing:
Have you done all your homework?
all your life/all day/all year etc (=during the whole of your life, a day, a year etc)
He had worked all his life in the mine.
The boys played video games all day.
They were quarrelling all the time (=very often or continuously).
Hannah didn't say a single word all the way back home (=during the whole of the journey).
all of
Almost all of the music was from Italian operas.
I've heard it all before.
She'd given up all hope of having a child.
2 every one of a number of people or things, or every thing or person of a particular type:
Someone's taken all my books!
Will all the girls please stand over here.
All children should be taught to swim.
16 per cent of all new cars sold in Western Europe these days are diesel-engined.
They all speak excellent English.
all of
important changes that will affect all of us
3 the only thing or things:
All you need is a hammer and some nails.
All I'm asking for is a little respect.
4 formal everything:
I'm doing all I can to help her.
I hope all is well with you.
All was dark and silent down by the harbour wall.
5 used to emphasize that you mean the greatest possible amount of the quality you are mentioning:
Can any of us say in all honesty that we did everything we could?
6

at all

used in negative statements and questions to emphasize what you are saying:
They've done nothing at all to try and put the problem right.
He's not looking at all well.
'Do you mind if I stay a little longer?' 'No, not at all.'
Has the situation improved at all?
7

all sorts/kinds/types of something

many different kinds of something:
Social workers have to deal with all kinds of problems.
8

of all people/things/places etc

used to emphasize that your statement is true of one particular person, thing, or place more than any other:
You shouldn't have done it. You of all people should know that.
She did not want to quarrel with Maria today, of all days.
9

all in all

used to show that you are considering every part of a situation:
All in all, it had been one of the most miserable days of Henry's life.
10

for all something

in spite of a particular fact:
For all his faults, he's a kind-hearted old soul.
For all my love of landscape, nothing could persuade me to spend another day in the Highlands.
11

in all

including every thing or person:
In all, there were 215 candidates.
We received £1550 in cash and promises of another £650, making £2200 in all.
12

and all

a) including the thing or things just mentioned:
They ate the whole fish - head, bones, tail, and all.
b) spoken informal used to emphasize a remark that you have just added:
And you can take that smelly old coat out of here, and all!
13

all of 50p/20 minutes etc

spoken used to emphasize how large or small an amount actually is:
The game lasted all of 58 seconds.
The repairs are going to cost all of £15,000.
14

it's all or nothing

used to say that unless something is done completely, it is not acceptable:
Half-heartedness won't do - it's got to be all or nothing.
15

give your all

to make the greatest possible effort in order to achieve something:
The coach expects every player to give their all in every game.
16

it was all I could do to do something

used to say that you only just succeeded in doing something:
It was all I could do to stop them hitting each other.
17

when all's said and done

spoken used to remind someone about an important point that needs to be considered:
When all's said and done, he's only a kid.

➔ for all somebody cares

at care2 (8)

➔ for all somebody knows

at know1 (33)

➔ all and sundry

at sundry (1)

➔ after all

at after1 (13)

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