English version

amenable

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishamenablea‧me‧na‧ble /əˈmiːnəbəl $ əˈmiːn- əˈmen-/ adjective  1 WILLINGwilling to accept what someone says or does without arguing She was always a very amenable child.amenable to Young people are more amenable than older citizens to the idea of immigration.2 suitable for a particular type of treatmentamenable for/to Such conditions may be amenable to medical intervention.
Examples from the Corpus
amenableNo suggestion was made that non-litigation costs were not amenable to being quantified by taxation.He was concerned with focusing quickly on the areas most amenable to cost reduction.He is not amenable to insidious influence.But there is another side to the substance abuse equation that may make it less amenable to interventions.Corporate culture is not something easily amenable to management control or manipulation.No one suggested that non-litigation costs were not amenable to taxation.amenable toThe administration is amenable to a compromise.Not all jobs are amenable to flexible scheduling.amenable for/toNo suggestion was made that non-litigation costs were not amenable to being quantified by taxation.These childbearing patterns are amenable to control, given the knowledge and will.But there is another side to the substance abuse equation that may make it less amenable to interventions.Carbohydrate replenishment Your body is most amenable to replenishing muscle glycogen in those first few hours after exercising.But others were both less recent and less amenable to resolution.Claude Simon's fiction at this time is particularly amenable to the criteria established by Ricardou.There is no reason why a contractual body performing public functions should not be amenable to these remedies.But the biblical material may simply not be amenable to what they would say.
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