English version

amiss

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishamissa‧miss1 /Ι™ΛˆmΙͺs/ adjective [not before noun] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š PROBLEMif something is amiss, there is a problem syn wrong πŸ”Š Elsa continued as if nothing was amiss.amiss with/in πŸ”Š There’s something amiss in their relationship.
Examples from the Corpus
amissβ€’ He had never been afraid or apprehensive before, but now he realised that something was amiss.β€’ I went out on to the roof to have a look and at first I could see nothing amiss.β€’ The workers decided to investigate the carriages, to see what was amiss.β€’ Even the hounds sensed something was amiss and became still, tails pressed between hind legs, watching.β€’ The right brain noted something amiss ... Meanwhile, Yeremi's logical tech-side dreamed.amiss with/inβ€’ There was also a pair of blue-rimmed glasses which Dame Edna Everage wouldn't have looked amiss in.β€’ The film has its rough patches: particularly the implausible speed with which Jeanne catches on to something being amiss with Mika.β€’ Like Toulmin, Taylor believes there is something amiss in our modern disconnection from nature.β€’ She was the incarnation of everything that had gone amiss in Sylvie's own life.β€’ The first step is to notice that something is amiss in the way the child learns and behaves in school.β€’ A bit of patience will not go amiss in this area either: what one sows another reaps.
amissamiss2 adverb British English πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 β†’ something would not come/go amiss2 β†’ take something amiss
Examples from the Corpus
amissβ€’ Begging you will not take it amiss I shall ever be your dutiful servant.β€’ There was also a pair of blue-rimmed glasses which Dame Edna Everage wouldn't have looked amiss in.
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