English version

analogous

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishanalogousa‧nal‧o‧gous /əˈnæləɡəs/ ●○○ AWL adjective formal  LIKE/SIMILARsimilar to another situation or thing so that a comparison can be madeanalogous to/with The report’s findings are analogous with our own.
Examples from the Corpus
analogousThese schemata are analogous to concepts, categories, or cards in a file.The healthy kind is analogous to how the body treats a simple flesh wound.The system is somewhat analogous to one that might be devised as a trot for students of Latin.I have been arguing here for what might be termed appropriate research, analogous to the notion of appropriate technology.The relation between the fabula and the syuzhet is roughly analogous to the one between practical and poetic language.The relationship of the teacher to research is analogous to the relationship of the musical soloist to the score.analogous to/withA self-sufficient settlement is analogous to a pin worker who must cut, bend, attach, and deliver by himself.The situation is analogous to another regulator in the body-the one controlling weight.This process is in many ways analogous to deductive reasoning.Moving clockwise, orange is analogous to red.But, contrary to popular belief, they are not at all analogous to tape recorders.Bandwidth is analogous to the number of lanes on a highway.The relation between the fabula and the syuzhet is roughly analogous to the one between practical and poetic language.In such a situation behaviour is understood to be analogous to war.
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