Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1500-1600
Language: Latin
Origin: , past participle of anticipare, from ante- ( ANTE-) + capere 'to take'

anticipate

verb
     
an‧tic‧i‧pate S3 [transitive]
1 to expect that something will happen and be ready for it:
Sales are better than anticipated.
anticipate changes/developments
The schedule isn't final, but we don't anticipate many changes.
anticipate problems/difficulties
We don't anticipate any problems.
A good speaker is able to anticipate an audience's needs and concerns.
anticipate (that)
This year, we anticipate that our expenses will be 15% greater.
It is anticipated that the research will have many different practical applications.
anticipate doing something
I didn't anticipate having to do the cooking myself!
2 to think about something that is going to happen, especially something pleasant:
Daniel was eagerly anticipating her arrival.
3 to do something before someone else:
Copernicus anticipated in part the discoveries of the 17th and 18th centuries.
anticipatory formal adjective:
the anticipatory atmosphere of a big college football game

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