English version

anyone

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishanyonean‧y‧one /ˈeniwʌn/ ●●● S1 W1 pronoun  1 EVERYONEused to refer to any person, when it is not important to say exactly who Anyone could win tonight. They offer help and advice to anyone interested in becoming a teacher. If anyone sees Lisa, ask her to call me. Anyone else who is interested in going on the trip should see me at the end of this lesson.2 PERSON/PEOPLEused in questions to mean ‘someone’ Does anyone want a drink? Is there anyone new coming to tonight’s meeting? Do you know anyone else who wants a ticket?3 used in negative sentences to mean no person I went to the bar but there wasn’t anyone there. I haven’t spoken to anyone all day.4 anyone?USAGE: Anyone or any one?Anyone is written as one word in this meaning: I didn't see anyone. Don't write: I didn't see any one.Any one of is usually written as separate words. You usually write: The same is true for any one of us.You don't usually use of after anyone.
Examples from the Corpus
anyoneAnyone can learn to swim in just a few lessons.Anyone foolish enough to believe in horoscopes needs a brain transplant.Is anyone home?Is anyone new coming to tonight's meeting?Why would anyone want to do that?Anyone elseWho can apply? Anyone else must obtain leave to make an application.Anyone else would have been embarrassed.This is a golfer's first impression. Anyone else would notice the second impression first - the beauty.anyone elseShe took no interest in Rain but this time she did not care about Oliver either, or anyone else.The Salvation Army in Sri Lanka had a reputation for making a rupee stretch further than anyone else.You just remember that you aint no better than anyone else.Would there be anyone else home?Had anyone else in the Mott family come down with polio as a result?It is not our purpose here to instruct you or anyone else in what is to be regarded as a significant event.We will take this action in your name or in the name of anyone else insured by this policy.If she had picked on anyone else there might have been some hope; but not a Felton.
anyone?anyone?spoken used after mentioning something to ask whether people agree with you, especially about something you do not like I think people are dressing way too casually. I mean, shorts in the office, anyone? anyone
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