Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: Late Latin
Origin: , past participle of appretiare, from Latin ad- 'to' + pretium 'price'

appreciate

verb
     
ap‧pre‧ci‧ate S2 W3
1 [transitive not in progressive] to understand how serious or important a situation or problem is or what someone's feelings are [= realize]
appreciate the significance/importance/value of something
He did not fully appreciate the significance of signing the contract.
appreciate that
We appreciate that caring for children is an important job.
appreciate what/how/why
It is difficult to appreciate how bad the situation had become.
2 [transitive] used to thank someone in a polite way or to say that you are grateful for something they have done:
Thanks ever so much for your help, I really appreciate it.
I appreciate your concern, but honestly, I'm fine.
I'd appreciate it if you let me get on with my job.
3 [transitive] to understand how good or useful someone or something is:
Her abilities are not fully appreciated by her employer.
I'm not an expert, but I appreciate fine works of art.
4 [intransitive] technical to gradually become more valuable over a period of time [≠ depreciate]:
Most investments are expected to appreciate at a steady rate.

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary