Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1500-1600
Language: Latin
Origin: , past participle of articulare 'to divide into joints, speak clearly', from articulus; ARTICLE

articulate

1 verb
     
ar‧tic‧u‧late1
1 [transitive] formal to express your ideas or feelings in words:
Many people are unable to articulate the unhappiness they feel.
2 [intransitive and transitive] to pronounce what you are saying in a clear and careful way:
He was so drunk that he could barely articulate his words.
3 [intransitive and transitive] technical if something such as a bone in your body is articulated to another thing, it is joined to it in a way that allows movement
4

articulate something with something

formal if one idea, system etc articulates with another idea, system etc, the two things are related and exist together:
a new course that is designed to articulate with the current degree course

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