English version

bail out

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishbail out phrasal verb1 bail somebody/something ↔ out (also bale somebody/something ↔ out British English)BFMONEY to do something to help someone out of trouble, especially financial problems πŸ”Š Some local businesses have offered to bail out the museum. πŸ”Š Sutton bailed his team out with a goal in the last minute.2 bail somebody ↔ outSC to leave a large sum of money with a court so that someone can be let out of prison while waiting for their trial πŸ”Š Clarke’s family paid Β£500 to bail him out.3 American EnglishTTA to escape from a plane, using a parachute syn bale out British English4 bail something ↔ out (also bale something ↔ out British English)TTW to remove water that has come into a boat β†’ bailβ†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
bail outβ€’ He owed thousands of dollars, and his mother had to sell land to bail him out.β€’ You can't expect your father to bail you out of trouble all the time.β€’ The government bailed out the ailing car company in order to protect jobs.
Related topics: Finance
bail-outˈbail-out noun [countable] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š informalBF financial help given to a person or a company that is in difficulty
Examples from the Corpus
bail-outβ€’ One reason for this reaction is that the market expects a bail-out.β€’ But when the time came for the annual bail-out, the recession-strapped Culture Ministry balked.β€’ Having just undertaken a costly bail-out of the thrifts and tightened regulations, it might seem that this problem is behind us.β€’ Monetary reform initially dawdled along so slowly that the International Monetary Fund has suspended its bail-out funding.
From Longman Business Dictionarybail out phrasal verb1[transitive] informalFINANCE bail somebody/something β†’ out to provide money to get a person or organization out of financial troubleThese enterprises think they can force the banks to bail them out. β†’ see also bail-out2[transitive] bail somebody β†’ outLAW to help someone to be set free on bail, usually by providing an amount of money that can be left with the courtSomehow she raised the $500 to bail him out.3FINANCE [intransitive] informal if you bail out of investments that are not doing well, you sell themThe stock has climbed to the low $40s from the low $30s, giving him a chance to bail out at a loss he could live with. β†’ bailβ†’ See Verb tablebail-outˈbail-out (also bailout) noun [countable] FINANCE providing money to a person or organization to get them out of financial troubleLosses totaling hundreds of millions of dollars led to an expensive bailout by its parent company.
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Verb table
bail
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theybail
he, she, itbails
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theybailed
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave bailed
he, she, ithas bailed
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad bailed
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill bail
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have bailed
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam bailing
he, she, itis bailing
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you, we, theyare bailing
Past
I, he, she, itwas bailing
you, we, theywere bailing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been bailing
he, she, ithas been bailing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been bailing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be bailing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been bailing
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