English version

balm

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishbalmbalm /bɑːm $ bɑːm, bɑːlm/ noun [countable, uncountable]  1 MDDCBan oily liquid with a strong pleasant smell that you rub into your skin, often to reduce pain lip balm2 literaryCOMFORT/MAKE somebody FEEL BETTER something that gives you comfortbalm for/to A drive through the countryside is balm for a weary soul.
Examples from the Corpus
balmThere would be sulphur as well as balm.Smoothing her balm on my lips with a single finger.Its friendliness is balm for tortured West Coast souls.Your lips have no natural moisturising ability so need frequent application of protective balm or stick.It absolved him of jealousy and spread balm on her irritations and reassured her that she had not the slightest regret.The performers were reassured by the balm of warm applause.A thin ribbon that separates unparalleled views from unattainable wealth, the walk is a welcome balm to the landlocked masses.balm for/toThis may seem a reassuring picture, a balm to B. S. Johnson's fears.The forest and the lapping water of the great river were a balm to the spirit.Her instants of selfless love, so focused upon me, are balm for my abraded ego.Hong Kong was a gentle balm to the dancers' ragged spirits.Its friendliness is balm for tortured West Coast souls.Judge: But this programme is balm to millions, many of them toothless, gaga and slumped across a Zimmer frame.I supposed talking about it gave some balm to her wounded spirit.A thin ribbon that separates unparalleled views from unattainable wealth, the walk is a welcome balm to the landlocked masses.
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