English version

ban

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Law, Government
banban1 /bΓ¦n/ ●●○ W3 noun [countable] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š SCLPGan official order that prevents something from being used or doneban on πŸ”Š a total ban on cigarette advertising πŸ”Š a call to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military β†’ test banCOLLOCATIONSADJECTIVES/NOUN + bana complete/total banThey are seeking a complete ban on nuclear testing.an outright ban (=a complete ban)an outright ban on gun ownershipan international/worldwide/global banan international ban on trade in endangered speciesa blanket ban (=including all possible cases)They imposed a blanket ban on beef products from Europe.a lifetime banHe faces a lifetime ban from athletics.an export/import banThe export ban on live cattle was brought in some years ago.an advertising banIs an advertising ban a denial of freedom of speech?a driving ban British EnglishHe was given a three-year driving ban and a fine.a chemical weapons bana global chemical weapons bana constitutional banThe Republican agenda included a constitutional ban on abortion.an immediate banThe group has called for an immediate ban on fur farming.verbsput/place/impose a banThe government has imposed an outright ban on fox hunting.lift a banThey promised to lift the immigration ban.call for a banFrench farmers have called for a ban on imports.enforce a ban (=make sure that it is obeyed)New measures must be taken to enforce the ban on guns and knives.face a banHe faced a four-year ban after failing a drugs test.
Examples from the Corpus
banβ€’ It also believes strongly that there should be a ban on the import of hazardous waste into the United Kingdom.β€’ Moscow is considering a ban on alcohol and tobacco advertising in most public places and on transport.β€’ The city has imposed a ban on smoking in all restaurants.β€’ A ban has been imposed on the hunting and killing of whales.β€’ Eminent scientists are clamouring for an outright ban on all chlorine substances.β€’ He has championed the popular ban on assault-style weapons, defending it with gusto as Republicans try to repeal it.β€’ Last year he was convicted of breaking that ban ... and was given a jail sentence.β€’ There has been worldwide protest against the ban on girls' education.β€’ The new prime minister agreed to lift the ban on opposition newspapers.β€’ The ban went into effect at midnight, Aug. 25,1988, Higgins said.β€’ The ban will take effect in November.β€’ The government is considering a total ban on the sale of handguns.β€’ I will veto any attempt to repeal the assault weapons ban or the Brady bill.ban onβ€’ a ban on logging in the forest
banban2 ●●○ verb (banned, banning) [transitive] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š FORBIDto say that something must not be done, seen, used etc syn prohibit opp allow πŸ”Š Smoking is banned in the building.ban somebody from doing something πŸ”Š Charlie’s been banned from driving for a year.a banned substance/drug (=a drug that people competing in a sport are not allowed to take because it improves their performance)β–Ί see thesaurus at forbid β€”banning noun [uncountable] πŸ”Š the banning of trade unionsβ†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
banβ€’ Many of the buildings in the old town were six storeys high and the lanes so narrow that all but pedestrians were banned.β€’ Films like that should be banned!β€’ Many doctors now say that boxing should be banned.β€’ a new international treaty banning all nuclear testsβ€’ They had banned all transit flights across the port.β€’ And with one of the country's top competition climbers banned by his own governing body, the situation could deteriorate.β€’ The Senate gave President Clinton a victory Thursday when lawmakers sustained his veto of a bill banning certain late-term abortions.β€’ She was banned from driving for 6 months.β€’ Relatives of the prisoners were banned from visiting them.β€’ Comics were banned in my house because my parents thought they weren't a good influence.β€’ Elephant ivory is banned in the U.S.β€’ Congress's effort to ban indecent materials on the Internet comes to the court March 19.β€’ The government has banned public officials from accepting gifts from foreigners.β€’ Well, I would ban them too if I had my way.β€’ "Lady Chatterley's Lover" was banned when it was first published.ban somebody from doing somethingβ€’ The military government banned private citizens from carrying guns.
From Longman Business Dictionarybanban1 /bæn/ noun [countable] an official order or law that forbids something from being used or donethe lifting of the export banNurses at the hospital last night ended their overtime ban (=ban on working more than the normal number of hours).ban onThe Environment Minister announced a ban on imports of potentially harmful industrial waste.banban2 verb (past tense and past participle banned, present participle banning) [transitive] to say officially that something must not be done, used etcThe government banned cigarette commercials.ban somebody from doing somethingIndustries will be banned from using high-sulphur content fuels.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
ban
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyban
he, she, itbans
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theybanned
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave banned
he, she, ithas banned
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad banned
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill ban
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have banned
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam banning
he, she, itis banning
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you, we, theyare banning
Past
I, he, she, itwas banning
you, we, theywere banning
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been banning
he, she, ithas been banning
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been banning
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be banning
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been banning
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