English version

beware

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishbewarebe‧ware /bɪˈweə $ -ˈwer/ ●○○ verb [intransitive, transitive only in imperative and infinitive] 🔊 🔊 WARNused to warn someone to be careful because something is dangerousbeware of 🔊 Beware of the dog!beware of doing something 🔊 They should beware of making hasty decisions. 🔊 Police warned drivers to beware.
Examples from the Corpus
bewareIf a mentor is pushing you beyond your limits, if you are feeling more and more exhausted, beware!The department warned consumers to beware.But less exalted leakers had to beware.Beware. Deep water.Beware of accidentally starting the engine while you are cleaning the blades.Trading Standards Officers in West Sussex warned consumers to beware of buying the second-hand domestic fire extinguishers.Beware of falling rocks.Was he telling her to beware of his wife?The police warn tourists to beware of pickpockets, especially in crowded places.Beware of the dog.Also beware of the trick of falling percentages.At the same time, beware of undermining their power bases by claiming undue credit for yourself.Mr Toad was loose on the racetrack, yowling and tooting to himself and let all beware who saw him come.beware ofA new church with a rapid initial growth rate should beware of an over-optimistic future projection.But the general principle seems secure: we must beware of any further large increases in the carbon dioxide level.No, of course you wouldn't. Beware of nostalgia.But beware of over-hasty discarding of notes.Aiken is also noted for other works, including a large body of juvenile fiction. Beware of the Bouquet.And beware of the passive fitness syndrome.Also beware of the trick of falling percentages.At the same time, beware of undermining their power bases by claiming undue credit for yourself.
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