Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1100-1200
Language: Old French
Origin: blamer, from Late Latin blasphemare; BLASPHEME

blame

1 verb
     
blame1 S2 W3 [transitive]
1 to say or think that someone or something is responsible for something bad:
Don't blame me - it's not my fault.
I blame his mother. She does everything for him.
blame somebody/something for something
Marie still blames herself for Patrick's death.
The report blames poor safety standards for the accident.
The decision to increase interest rates was widely blamed (=blamed by many people) for the crisis.
blame something on somebody/something
One of the computers is broken and she's blaming it on me.
The crash was blamed on pilot error.
2

somebody/something is to blame (for something)

used to say that someone or something is responsible for something bad:
Officials believe that more than one person may be to blame for the fire.
partly/largely/entirely etc to blame
Television is partly to blame.
3

I don't blame you/you can hardly blame him etc

spoken used to say that you think it was right or reasonable for someone to do what they did:
'She's left her husband.' 'I don't blame her, after the way he treated her.'
You can hardly blame him for not waiting.
4

don't blame me

spoken used when you are advising someone not to do something but you think that they will do it in spite of your advice:
Buy it then, but don't blame me when it breaks down.
5

somebody only has himself/herself to blame

spoken used to say that someone's problems are their own fault:
If he fails his exams, he'll only have himself to blame.

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