Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Language: Old English
Origin:

blind

1 adjective
     
blind1 S2 W3
1

unable to see

a) MI unable to see [↪ colour-blind, visually impaired, handicapped]:
a school for blind children
the needs of blind people
totally/completely/almost/partially blind
She's almost blind in her right eye.
He was slowly going blind (=becoming blind).
Beverley was born blind.
b)

the blind

[plural]MI people who are unable to see:
talking books for the blind
c)

as blind as a bat

unable to see well - used humorously:
I'm as blind as a bat without my glasses.
d)

blind with tears/rage/pain etc

unable to see because of tears, pain, or a strong emotion [↪ blindly]:
She screamed at him, her eyes blind with tears.
2

be blind to something

to completely fail to notice or realize something [↪ blindly]:
International companies are all too often blind to local needs.
He was totally blind to the faults of his children.
3

turn a blind eye (to something)

to deliberately ignore something that you know should not be happening:
Teachers were turning a blind eye to smoking in school.
4

not take/pay a blind bit of notice

British English informal to completely ignore what someone does or says, especially in a way that is annoying:
He never pays a blind bit of notice to what his staff tell him.
5

not make a blind bit of difference

British English informal used to emphasize that whatever someone says or does will not change the situation at all:
Try and talk to her if you want. But I don't think it'll make a blind bit of difference.
6

feelings

a)

blind faith/prejudice/obedience etc

strong feelings that someone has without thinking about why they have them - used to show disapproval:
Blind faith sent thousands of people to a pointless war.
a story about blind loyalty
b)

blind panic/rage

strong feelings of fear or anger that you cannot control:
In a moment of blind panic she had pulled the trigger and shot the man dead.
Blind rage took hold of him.
7

road

blind bend/corner

TTR a corner in a road that you cannot see beyond when you are driving
8

the blind leading the blind

used to say that people who do not know much about what they are doing are guiding or advising others who know nothing at all
9

aircraft

TTA blind flying is when you use only instruments to fly an aircraft because you cannot see through cloud, mist etc
10

blind drunk

British English informalDFD extremely drunk
blindness noun [uncountable]

➔ rob somebody blind

at rob (3)

; ➔ swear blind

at swear (3)

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