English version

boom

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishboomboom1 /buːm/ ●○○ noun  1 increase in business [singular]BPE a quick increase of business activity opp slump The boom has created job opportunities.boom in a sudden boom in the housing marketconsumer/investment/property etc boom the post-war property boomboom years/times In boom times, airlines do well. the economic boom of the 1950s The economy went from boom to bust (=from increasing to decreasing) very quickly. boom town2 when something is popular [singular]POPULARLOT/LARGE NUMBER OR AMOUNT an increase in how popular or successful something is, or in how often it happens the disco boom of the 1970sboom in the boom in youth soccer in the U.S. baby boom3 sound [countable]CPMW a deep loud sound that you can hear for several seconds after it begins, especially the sound of an explosion or a large gun sonic boomsee thesaurus at sound4 boat [countable]TTW a long pole on a boat that is attached to the bottom of a sail, and that you move to change the position of the sail5 long pole [countable] a) TBTIa long pole used as part of a piece of equipment that loads and unloads things b) TCPTCBa long pole that has a camera or microphone on the end6 on a river/harbour [countable]TTWTBC something that is stretched across a river or a bay to prevent things floating down or across itCOLLOCATIONSADJECTIVES/NOUN + boom an economic boomthe post-war economic booma property/housing boom (=a sudden increase in house prices)People made a lot of money in the 1980s property boom.a consumer/spending boom (=a sudden increase in the amount people spend)Various factors caused the consumer boom.a building/construction boom (=a sudden increase in building work)There’s been a recent construction boom in the Gulf.an investment boomthe investment boom of the past few yearsverbscause/lead to a boomTax cuts sometimes lead to an economic boom.trigger/spark a boom (=start it)The lower interest rates triggered an economic boom.fuel a boom (=add to it)The energy crisis is fuelling a boom in alternative energy.enjoy a boomSince then, China has enjoyed a remarkable boom.boom + NOUNthe boom years/timesthe boom years of the late 1980sphrasesgo from boom to bust (=change from doing very well economically to doing very badly)The Mexican economy went from boom to bust very quickly.at the height of the boomThey sold their house at the height of the boom.
Examples from the Corpus
boomIn Gwinnett County, Ga., a boom that began more than a decade ago continues with no end in sight.A more pressing problem is Mexico's dramatic baby boom.There were two big booms, then the cloud started forming.a record-breaking boom in tourismCanada enjoyed a real economic boom in the postwar years.The fitness boom started in the 1970s.The IT market is growing, thanks to the Internet boom.The bias litigation boom is in large measure traceable to key changes in the Civil Rights Act of 1991.a log boomThere was a loud boom. The chemical works was on fire.Witnesses heard the first loud boom at 3:03 p.m.From beginning to end, each cycle of boom and slump lasts, Kondratiev argued, for about fifty years.The trends in prices and construction track very closely past cycles of booms and busts.The impact of the property boom was first felt in the financial markets.the post-war property boomA sonic boom was heard by observers on the shore as the meteorite fell to earth.Motorola is one of the leaders in the global technology boom.Extend your arms Keep them well down the boom to get the rig as upright as possible. 3.The boom years brought by Brian Little have gone.the boom in cellular phone ownershipThe boom of cannon continued for most of the day.economic boomBy the eighteenth century, an economic boom had resulted in an active type of pre-capitalism, ready to take off.Is an economic boom an unsustainable trend?Its appearance coincided with an economic boom and an ideological crisis.The needy themselves, buoyed up by economic boom, have been happy to go along.The potential economic boom has been welcomed by business leaders in Swindon.Treatment of blacks altered slightly with the great depression of the thirties and the economic boom of the wartime forties.Indeed, in almost every speech, he celebrates the economic boom of what he calls the Clinton-Gore administration.Our overconsumption is fueling this economic boom, but at a heavy cost to the environment.
Related topics: Colours & sounds, Trade
boomboom2 ●○○ verb  1 [intransitive usually in progressive]SUCCESSFUL if business, trade, or a particular area is booming, it is increasing and being very successful Business was booming, and money wasn’t a problem. Tourism on the island has boomed.2 CSAY (also boom out) [transitive] to say something in a loud deep voice ‘Ladies and gentlemen, ’ his voice boomed out.3 C (also boom out) [intransitive] to make a loud deep sound Guns boomed in the distance.booming adjective a booming economy
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
boomCellnet has 800,000 subscribers, and business is booming.Coastal development and tourism are booming.Lower marginal rates would also improve work incentives and shrink the black economy, which is said to be booming.Tourism boomed here in the late 1990s.Every time Peter said a word, his father would boom him.I boomed one drive 265 yards.A crash of thunder boomed so loudly that the floor shook.We're happy to report that business is booming this year.Business ... boomingIt has 600,000 mobile phone subscribers and business is booming.People migrated into the villages and towns of the coalfield where business was booming.When their businesses were booming, they could afford to pose as tough-talking entrepreneurs keen to take on the telephone companies.Its paging business was booming, and annual operating profits broke the $ 1 billion mark.Business is booming for an Avis franchisee in the Carolinas despite well-publicized allegations of racial discrimination against customers.Schilling fought it, but since business was booming, he was shouted down.Business is also booming in the Far East, though Hong Kong suffered from higher costs and increased import duties.Or else because business was booming, the money was there, and the experiments might just possibly pay off some day.
From Longman Business Dictionaryboomboom1 /buːm/ noun [countable, uncountable]1ECONOMICS a time when business activity increases rapidly, so that the demand for goods increases, prices and wages go up, and unemployment fallsa boom in the building sectorAfter four years of economic boom, this year saw a slowing down of the economy.Government economic policy encouraged a consumer boom followed by a deep recession.A system of low taxation on land sales helped fuel a property boom. compare slump2FINANCE a time when activity on the stockmarket reaches a high level and share prices are very highHopes of further interest rate cuts sparked off a shares boom yesterday.boomboom2 verb [intransitive]ECONOMICS if business, trade, or the economy is booming, it is very successful and growingSince the 1980s tourism has boomed here.The company has 600,000 mobile phone subscribers and business is booming.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
boom
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyboom
he, she, itbooms
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyboomed
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave boomed
he, she, ithas boomed
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad boomed
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill boom
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have boomed
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam booming
he, she, itis booming
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you, we, theyare booming
Past
I, he, she, itwas booming
you, we, theywere booming
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been booming
he, she, ithas been booming
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been booming
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be booming
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been booming
> View Less