English version

boost

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishboostboost1 /buːst/ ●●○ verb [transitive]  1 INCREASE IN NUMBER OR AMOUNTto increase or improve something and make it more successful The new resort area has boosted tourism.boost somebody’s confidence/morale/ego The win boosted the team’s confidence.see thesaurus at increase2 (also boost up)LIFT to help someone reach a higher place by lifting or pushing them He boosted her up.3 if a rocket or motor boosts a spacecraft, it makes it go up into space or go in a particular direction4 American English informal to steal something→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
boostThe plan was meant to boost agricultural production.The goal is to boost business for Zegna merchandise.Profits last year were boosted by £69m of interest savings from the £572m rights issue a year ago.The interim dividend is being boosted by nearly half although the final payment is weightier.Greater consumer access to the Internet has boosted electronic retailing.About 36 percent of employers plan to boost hiring the rest of this year.Periodic applications of diluted fish emulsion will boost plant appearance, too.The multi-million dollar ad campaign has failed to boost sales.Jane Dee Hull promised in her state-of-the-state address to boost spending even higher this year.Perhaps year-round education would boost student performance.I boosted the kid up so he could reach the branch.This payment will boost their pension funds by an average of 20 per cent.He wanted to boost their performance in school and help them find and hold jobs.boost somebody’s confidence/morale/egoFree phone calls to home can help to boost the troops' morale.
Related topics: Electricity, Gas, coal, oil
boostboost2 ●●○ noun  1 [singular]HELP something that gives someone more confidence, or that helps something increase, improve, or become successfulboost to a major boost to the economyboost for a multimillion-pound boost for the British film industry Add a little more vanilla, to give the flavor a boost.get/receive a boost The community will get a boost from a new library and recreation center.morale/ego boost The poll provided a morale boost for the Conservatives.2 give somebody a boost (up)3 [uncountable]TPETPG an increase in the amount of power available to a rocket, piece of electrical equipment etc
Examples from the Corpus
boostSome women may need an extra boost from vitamins.I thought the Menard motors were running with 55 inches of boost.The Commerce Department said incomes grew by 0.6 percent, while spending got a 0.7 percent boost.Bush got a significant boost in the final days before the recess from two votes in the House of Representatives.Breathtaking planetary aspects and movements will give your confidence and personal affairs a tremendous boost.get/receive a boostHigh note: A scanner appeal has hit a high note after receiving a boost from Cleveland police.Earlier in the day, bonds received a boost as the central bank said it would buy government bonds outright.The Clippers got a boost early from the return of Brian Williams, who missed four games with a strained left arch.He recently got a boost when Mr Mubarak replaced a rival, Salah Halabi, as army chief of staff.Financial-services shares got a boost after J. P. Morgan.
From Longman Business Dictionaryboostboost1 /buːst/ verb [transitive]1to increase something such as production, sales, or pricesThe advertising campaign is intended to boost sales.Another cut in interest rates would boost stock prices.800 jobs have been cut in an attempt to boost productivity.2boost the economy to make the economy stronger, so that business activity increases, prices and wages go up, and unemployment fallsThe US Treasury ordered the Fed to lift the yen against the dollar in hopes of boosting the US economy before the November election.3boost confidence to increase confidenceThe economy needs a positive jolt to boost consumer confidence.4to advertise a producta special promotion to boost their new product→ See Verb tableboostboost2 noun [singular]1something that helps to increase something such as production, sales, or pricesThat optimistic outlook gave stocks and the dollar a boost.Sales could get a boost in January and February.2something that helps something to improve or become more successfulThe price of oil could soon be $15 a barrel or less, which would be a welcome boost to the American economy.The sale of such a large nuclear power reactor is expected to give a boost to Canada’s nuclear industry.The market got a boost on Friday when the Federal Reserve Board cut the interest rate that it charges member banks.3something that helps to improve confidence or encourage peopleThe end of the war would almost certainly provide some sort of boost to business and consumer confidence.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
boost
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyboost
he, she, itboosts
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyboosted
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave boosted
he, she, ithas boosted
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad boosted
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill boost
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have boosted
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam boosting
he, she, itis boosting
> View More
you, we, theyare boosting
Past
I, he, she, itwas boosting
you, we, theywere boosting
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been boosting
he, she, ithas been boosting
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been boosting
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be boosting
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been boosting
> View Less