English version

bring

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishbringbring /brɪŋ/ ●●● S1 W1 verb (past tense and past participle brought /brɔːt $ brɒːt/) [transitive] 🔊 🔊 1 a) to take something or someone with you to the place where you are now, or to the place you are talking abouttake 🔊 Did you bring an umbrella? 🔊 It was the first time Joey had ever brought a girl home. 🔊 They brought news of further fighting along the border.bring somebody/something to somebody/something 🔊 Is it OK if I bring some friends to the party?bring somebody/something with you 🔊 For some reason, Jesse had brought a tape recorder with him. b) to get something for someone and take it to thembring somebody something 🔊 Can you bring me another beer? 🔊 Robert asked the waiter to bring him the check. 🔊 While she was in prison, friends used to bring her books.bring somebody/something to somebody/something 🔊 He expects me to bring everything to him.see thesaurus at take2 CAUSE a) to make a particular situation exist, or cause a particular feeling 🔊 efforts to bring peace to the region 🔊 The strikes are expected to bring chaos. 🔊 The senator’s speech brought an angry response from civil rights groups. b) to cause someone or something to reach a particular state or conditionbring something to an end/close/halt/conclusion (=make something stop) 🔊 The trial was swiftly brought to an end. 🔊 It was the war that first brought him to power (=made him have power over a country). 🔊 So far the US has been unable to bring him to justice (=make him be punished for his actions). 🔊 Bring the sauce to the boil (=heat it until it boils). 🔊 The country had been brought to its knees (=caused to be in such a bad condition that it is almost impossible to continue).3 [always + adverb/preposition] to make something move in a particular directionbring something up/down/round etc 🔊 Bring your arm up slowly until it’s level with your shoulder. 🔊 The storm brought the old oak tree crashing down.4 GO[always + adverb/preposition] if something brings people to a place, it makes them go there 🔊 The discovery of gold brought thousands of people to the Transvaal.what brings you here? (=used to ask why someone is in a particular place) 🔊 What brings you here on a night like this?5 to make something available for people to use, have, enjoy etc 🔊 The expansion of state education brought new and wider opportunities for working class children.bring something to somebody/something 🔊 The government is launching a new initiative to bring jobs to deprived areas.bring somebody something 🔊 It’s a good sign – let’s hope it will bring us some luck.6 if a period of time brings a particular event or situation, the event or situation happens during that time 🔊 The 1930s brought unemployment and economic recession. 🔊 Who knows what the future will bring?7 bring charges/a lawsuit/a court case/a prosecution/a claim (against somebody)8 bring a smile to somebody’s lips/face9 bring tears to somebody’s eyes10 bring the total/number/score etc to something11 cannot/could not bring yourself to do something12 spoken used when saying that something is the next thing that you want to talk aboutthat/this/which brings me to ... 🔊 This brings me to the main point of today’s meeting.13 if a programme is brought to you by a particular television or radio company, they broadcast it or make itsomething is brought to you by somebody 🔊 This programme is brought to you by the BBC.14 bring something to bear (on/upon something)15 bring home the baconCOLLOCATIONSMeaning 2: nounsbring peace/warThe treaty brought peace to both England and France.bring chaosA bomb scare brought chaos to the town centre yesterday.bring somebody pleasure/joy/pain/grief etcThe decision brought him great relief.phrasesbring something to an end/halt (=especially something bad)It is our responsibility to discuss how this conflict can be brought to an end.bring something to a close (=especially a meeting)At last the meeting was brought to a close.bring something to a conclusion (=used especially in law)Juvenile cases need to be brought to a conclusion quickly.bring somebody to power (=make someone have power over a country)The revolution brought to power a communist government.bring somebody to justice (=catch and punish someone for their actions)The authorities swore that the killers would be brought to justice.bring somebody into contact with somebody/somethingThe people of the island were suddenly brought into contact with the outside world.bring something/somebody to their knees (=make it almost impossible for someone or something to continue)A severe drought brought the country to its knees.THESAURUSbring to take something or someone to the place where you are now, or the place where you are goingHave you brought your ticket with you?He asked his father if he could bring a friend to stay.take to move something to another place, or help someone go to another placeI took a book with me to read on the train.He was taken to hospital by ambulance.get (also fetch especially British English) to go to another place and come back with something or someoneI went upstairs to get my jacket.Joseph told me to fetch the doctor, so I ran to the village. bring something ↔ about bring somebody/something ↔ along bring somebody/something around/round bring back bring somebody/something ↔ down bring something ↔ down on/upon somebody bring something ↔ forth bring something ↔ forward bring somebody/something ↔ in bring somebody/something into something bring something ↔ off bring something ↔ on bring something on/upon somebody bring somebody onto something bring something ↔ out bring somebody out in something bring somebody/something round bring somebody through (something) bring somebody ↔ together bring somebody/something ↔ up→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
bringThe painting brought $540,000 at the auction.Everyone's bringing a bit of food and a bottle to the party.Leland's secret of success was bringing a gun-maker's insistence on accuracy and precision to the production of car components.The tourist industry brings a lot of money into the area.This only brought a plague of crickets to the already upset humans of Bryan.The article brought angry letters from readers.I brought food for everyone.Janine brought her hands slowly up to her face.Now he is convinced it was a bad one and has already taken the first steps to bring him back.When are you going to bring him in for his injections?I hope he hasn't brought his brother with him.In recent years this has been brought into sharp focus with growing public concern for a healthier and safer environment.The only time we use the VCR is when they bring Joey to our house.Thanks for bringing me to work.I brought my Nikes - they're about the only decent shoes I have.Adolescence brings physical and emotional changes.Is it okay if I bring some clothes with me to wash?I brought some work home and tried to get it finished in the evening.We've brought someone to see you!Always bring the car to a full stop at a stop sign.The discovery of gold brought thousands of people to California in 1849.They could only wait for the next report from Mission Controland wonder if Hal would bring up the subject himself.Such a war, Cuevas predicted, would bring useless sacrifices and greater losses in territory.For every skin that's dry before its time, Estée Lauder brings you Time Zone.Did you bring your coat?bring somebody somethingCould you bring me a glass of water?brought to its kneesThe empire must be brought to its knees.The Mafia was brought to its knees.Our motor industry has been brought to its knees with redundancies at Rolls-Royce and Ford.what brings you here?But real estate is not what brings me here.What brings you here, then?What brings you here to court so hastily?that/this/which brings me to ...We get little enough music, and no glamour. Which brings me to a serious point, my dear.Any sum, nomatterhow small, gratefully received. Which brings me to money.And this brings me to my fourth point, and that is the notion of domestic - public opposition.And that brings me to my good friend, Ian Adamson.All this brings me to our getting here, to St-Jean.But this brings me to the cardinal rule when buying - always choose a house which will be easy to sell.I can feel my temperature rising-which brings me to thermometers and why can't I read them?Costs were irrelevant. Which brings me to what may turn out to be the tragedy of this election.something is brought to you by somebodyThis program is brought to you by Pepsi.
From Longman Business Dictionarybringbring /brɪŋ/ verb (past tense and past participle brought /brɔːtbrɒːt/) LAW bring a case/charge/suit/lawsuit to organize a legal case against someonea string of lawsuits brought by jobseekers who think they’re the victims of discriminationCompany directors are meeting with law enforcement officials to determine whether to bring criminal charges. bring something → down bring something → forward bring in bring something → out→ See Verb table
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Verb table
bring
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theybring
he, she, itbrings
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theybrought
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave brought
he, she, ithas brought
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad brought
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill bring
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have brought
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam bringing
he, she, itis bringing
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you, we, theyare bringing
Past
I, he, she, itwas bringing
you, we, theywere bringing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been bringing
he, she, ithas been bringing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been bringing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be bringing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been bringing
> View Less