English version

brood

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishbroodbrood1 /bruːd/ verb [intransitive] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 WORRIEDTHINK ABOUTto keep thinking about something that you are worried or upset about πŸ”Š Don’t sit at home brooding all day.brood over/about/on πŸ”Š There’s no point brooding over it – she’s gone.β–Ί see thesaurus at think2 HBPif a bird broods, it sits on its eggs to make the young birds break outβ†’ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
broodβ€’ Instead, a burnt man kneels near a puddle, quietly brooding.β€’ Ken had little to do except sit and brood.β€’ Don't sit at home brooding about how badly you've been treated.β€’ It becomes heavy work to distract Harriet from brooding about lost Elton.β€’ You can't spend all your time at home brooding about the way he treated you.β€’ Austin sat in the corner brooding and looking sorry for himself.β€’ Dad alternately brooded and raged, and Mum wasn't much better.β€’ Ben Nevis brooded benevolently over all.β€’ There's no point in brooding -- forget about her.β€’ The poetry spends a lot of time brooding over death.β€’ Recession is biting at Softwright Systems, but Nick Durrant has no time to brood over it.β€’ Achilles sits in his tent, brooding over the wrongs done to him.β€’ Looking this way at myself, I am less inclined to brood over whatever blessings may have been withheld.brood over/about/onβ€’ All those lovely California cottonwoods and eucalypti brooded on all sides.β€’ But there was no use brooding on it: the full story would never be known now.β€’ The divorce still feels painful, so I try not to brood on it too much.β€’ It becomes heavy work to distract Harriet from brooding about lost Elton.β€’ The Holy Spirit is there too brooding over the waters at every baptism.β€’ She must remember them, but not brood on them.β€’ They force the reader to slow down, to dwell or brood on what is happening.β€’ She's still brooding over what to do next.β€’ Looking this way at myself, I am less inclined to brood over whatever blessings may have been withheld.
broodbrood2 noun [countable] πŸ”Š πŸ”Š 1 HBPa family of young birds all born at the same time2 FAMILYa family with a lot of children – used humorouslybrood of πŸ”Š Mary has a whole brood of grandchildren.
Examples from the Corpus
broodβ€’ So where were these sacrificial adopted broods coming from?β€’ His actions had triggered full-scale rebellion by the hybrids and by the vaster Stealer brood of true-seeming humans.β€’ This will ensure good growth in the brood.β€’ The youngest bees clean out the cells and nurse the brood.β€’ He had been the largest of the brood, always alert and playing.β€’ It takes at least an hour to get the whole brood ready to go to school.
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Verb table
brood
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theybrood
he, she, itbroods
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theybrooded
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave brooded
he, she, ithas brooded
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad brooded
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill brood
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have brooded
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam brooding
he, she, itis brooding
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you, we, theyare brooding
Past
I, he, she, itwas brooding
you, we, theywere brooding
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been brooding
he, she, ithas been brooding
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been brooding
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be brooding
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been brooding
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