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Sense: 1, 3-6
Date: 1300-1400
Origin: Early French broisse, from Old French broce ( BRUSH12); probably because branches from bushes and trees were used to make brushes.
Sense: 2
Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old French
Origin: broce 'broken branches, brushwood'

brush

1 noun
     
brush
brush1 S3
1

object for cleaning/painting

[countable]DT an object that you use for cleaning, painting, making your hair tidy etc, made with a lot of hairs, bristles, or thin pieces of plastic fastened to a handle [↪ broom]:
a scrubbing brush
hairbrush, nailbrush, paintbrush, toothbrush
2

trees

[uncountable]
a) DN small bushes and trees that cover an area of land
b) DN branches that have broken off bushes and trees
3

movement

[singular] a movement in which you brush something to remove dirt, make something smooth, tidy etc:
I'll just give my hair a quick brush.
4

touch

[singular] a quick light touch, made by chance when two things or people pass each other:
the brush of her silk dress as she walked past
5 [countable] a time when you only just avoid an unpleasant situation or argument
brush with
His first brush with the law came when he was 16.
A brush with death can make you appreciate life more.
6

tail

[countable]HBA the tail of a fox
broadbrush

; ➔ daft as a brush

at daft (1)

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