English version

buoyancy

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Finance, Physics
buoyancybuoy‧an‧cy /ˈbɔɪənsi $ ˈbɔɪənsi, ˈbuːjənsi/ noun [uncountable] 🔊 🔊 1 ON/ON TOP OFthe ability of an object to float2 ON/ON TOP OFthe power of a liquid to make an object float 🔊 Salt water has more buoyancy than fresh water.3 HAPPYa feeling of happiness and a belief that you can deal with problems easily4 BFthe ability of prices, a business etc to quickly get back to a high level after a difficult period
Examples from the Corpus
buoyancyThen she hit on a buoyancy technique.Its chanting quality sounds a note of buoyancy and music in the evocation of the enormity of the Crucifixion.The air's buoyancy and the sun's ray Are of advantage to me.A few other sectors have some buoyancy.There is not much temperature-produced density contrast at a given level; thus this does not much affect the buoyancy force.the buoyancy of light woodSix-year-old Michael Smith and his parents were spotted by a passing yacht as they clung to a tiny buoyancy bag in darkness.The life streams were flowing with buoyancy.
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