English version

bypass

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
Related topics: Roads
bypassby‧pass1 /ˈbaɪpɑːs $ -pæs/ noun [countable]  1 (heart) bypass operation/surgery2 TTRa road that goes around a town or other busy area rather than through itring road3 T technical a tube that allows gas or liquid to flow around something rather than through it
Examples from the Corpus
bypassBy 1904, however, the artificial channel had already silted up, and a bypass had to be cut.Another bypass was cut; it too silted up.I am grateful for his congratulations to the Government on the completion of the Chelmsford bypass.The defeated bypass proposal was unveiled by parish councillor Edward Lucas.The normal gastric mucosa can prevent bypass diffusion of potentially noxious substances from the gastric lumen.The railway station has been re-sited down the line to make room for the town's bypass.The first is following the opening of the bypass, but prior to the improvement of Woolmer Road.People with kidney failure are increasingly undergoing bypass and vessel-opening procedures.
Related topics: Roads
bypassbypass2 verb [transitive]  1 TTRto go around a town or other busy place rather than through it Interstate 8 bypasses the town to the north.2 AVOIDto avoid obeying a rule, system, or someone in an official position Francis bypassed his manager and wrote straight to the director.
→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
bypassInstitutions that obstruct the popular will or stand between it and the actions of government get bypassed.Noteworthy also during this period was the growing number of inter-republic contacts, treaties and agreements bypassing central control.Or bypass him and go directly to each home site and sign up there.The card allows you to bypass long lines at the bank.To bypass ministerial demarcation lines, several territorial production complexes have been set up.More often than not, however, Blue will bypass the bar and go to the movie theater several blocks away.This highway bypasses the downtown area.An increasing amount of share trading, particularly in international shares, was bypassing the floor of the Stock Exchange.The builder, a developer from New Jersey, flew in his own construction crew, bypassing the local carpenters.There should be no way of bypassing the security measures on the computer.Mark Souder and John Hostettler, also of Indiana, did not, and the speaker will now bypass their fund-raisers.
From Longman Business Dictionarybypassby‧pass /ˈbaɪpɑːs-pæs/ verb [transitive] to avoid something such as a law, rule, or system, or to avoid involving someone in a processCompanies will always try to bypass laws aimed at protecting workers’ rights.Customers can buy direct from producers and bypass the middleman.→ See Verb table
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Verb table
bypass
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theybypass
he, she, itbypasses
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Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theybypassed
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave bypassed
he, she, ithas bypassed
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad bypassed
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill bypass
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have bypassed
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam bypassing
he, she, itis bypassing
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you, we, theyare bypassing
Past
I, he, she, itwas bypassing
you, we, theywere bypassing
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been bypassing
he, she, ithas been bypassing
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been bypassing
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be bypassing
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been bypassing
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