English version

clamour

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishclamourclam‧our1 British English, clamor American English /ˈklæmə $ -ər/ noun [singular, uncountable] 🔊 🔊 1 LOUD/NOISYa very loud noise made by a large group of people or animals 🔊 He shouted over the rising clamour of voices.2 STRONG FEELING OR BELIEFthe expression of feelings of anger and shock by a large number of people – used especially in news reportsclamour for 🔊 Trouillot disregarded the growing public clamour for her resignation.clamorous adjective
Examples from the Corpus
clamourWe approached the east landing cautiously and the cliffs awoke with bird clamour which was to assail our ears until we left.This cloying commercial clamour had the New Zealand public wound up.Then the familiar clamour of bickering voices that will last for months began.Just then the raucous clamour of alarm bells sounded from all over the house and from the basement area ahead of him.Guildford returned leading a large company of masked figures who marched into the hall to the raucous clamour of tambour and fife.The station was filled with the clamour of shouting voices and movement.The clamour reached a crescendo last year when the full extent of the problems relating to the Solicitors Indemnity Fund emerged.public clamourBut there is no public clamour for the war to end nor any sign that the Kremlin is ready to back down.He suggested the basic reason for the public clamour over strikes reflects their political repercussions rather than any direct economic impact.
clamourclamour2 British English, clamor American English verb [intransitive] 🔊 🔊 1 [always + adverb/preposition]ASK FOR something/ASK somebody TO DO something to demand something loudlyclamour for 🔊 The audience cheered, clamoring for more.clamour to do something 🔊 All his friends were clamouring to know where he’d been.2 LOUD/NOISYto talk or shout loudly 🔊 Children clamored excitedly.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
clamourThe result is sometimes desperation prose, each individual phrase clamouring for attention.With local elections due in April 1991, the party knew that its candidates would be clamouring for lots of vote-winning enticements.That is why environmentalists have often clamoured for regulation, as the best way to conceal the true costs of policy.This was leaked to the media, who began to clamour for stricter control.Carolyn had always resented being left behind, and clamoured for the shops with their sweets, toys and new clothes.Outside investors are apparently clamouring to have a share of the service, which is expected to launch later this year.clamour to do somethingAlthough it was the size of a pantry, they endlessly clung to the bars and clamoured to be let out.Parents will naturally clamour to get their kids into schools at the top of the performance tables.Outside investors are apparently clamouring to have a share of the service, which is expected to launch later this year.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.
Verb table
clamour (BrE)
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyclamour (BrE)
he, she, itclamours (BrE)
> View More
Past
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyclamoured (BrE)
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave clamoured
he, she, ithas clamoured
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad clamoured
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill clamour
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have clamoured
> View Less
Continuous Form
Present
Iam clamouring
he, she, itis clamouring
> View More
you, we, theyare clamouring
Past
I, he, she, itwas clamouring
you, we, theywere clamouring
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been clamouring
he, she, ithas been clamouring
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been clamouring
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be clamouring
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been clamouring
> View Less