Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1700-1800
Language: Latin
Origin: collapsus, past participle of collabi, from com- ( COM-) + labi 'to fall, slide'

collapse

1 verb
     
Related topics: Illness and Disability
col‧lapse1 S3
1

structure

[intransitive] if a building, wall etc collapses, it falls down suddenly, usually because it is weak or damaged:
Uncle Ted's chair collapsed under his weight.
The roof had collapsed long ago.
2

illness/injury

[intransitive] to suddenly fall down or become unconscious because you are ill or weak:
He collapsed with a heart attack while he was dancing.
Marion's legs collapsed under her.
3

fail

[intransitive] if a system, idea, or organization collapses, it suddenly fails or becomes too weak to continue:
The luxury car market has collapsed.
I thought that without me the whole project would collapse.
4

prices

[intransitive] if prices, levels, etc collapse, they suddenly become much lower:
There were fears that property prices would collapse.
5

sit/lie

[intransitive] to suddenly sit down, especially because you are very tired or want to relax:
I was so exhausted when I got home, I just collapsed on the sofa.
6

fold something smaller

[intransitive and transitive] if a piece of furniture or equipment collapses, or if you collapse it, you can fold it so that it becomes smaller:
The legs on our card table collapse so we can store it in the closet.
7

medical

[intransitive]MI if a lung or a blood vessel collapses, it suddenly becomes flat, so that it no longer has any air or blood in it

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