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Date: 1400-1500
Language: Old French
Origin: , past participle of comprendre, from Latin comprehendere; COMPREHEND

comprise

verb
     
com‧prise W3 [not in progressive] formal
1 [linking verb] to consist of particular parts, groups etc:
The house comprises two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a living room.
be comprised of somebody/something
The committee is comprised of well-known mountaineers.
2 [transitive] to form part of a larger group of people or things [= constitute, make up]:
Women comprise a high proportion of part-time workers.
WORD CHOICE: WORD CHOICE:

include, consist of, comprise, be composed of, be made up of
Use include to mention only some of the things that something has as its parts The price includes lunch.If you want to mention all the parts that something has in it, use consist of, comprise, be composed of, or be made up of The Romance family of languages consists of French, Spanish, Italian, and several other languages. The house comprises two bedrooms, a kitchen and a living room. The jury was composed of nine whites, one Hispanic, and two Asian Americans. an organization made up of 600,000 small business owners!! Do not say that something 'is consisted of' certain things or that it 'consists' them. Say it consists of them.!! Do not say that something 'comprises of' certain things, even though you might hear English speakers say this. Most careful users consider this to be incorrect so you should avoid using it.!! Do not say that something 'is composed by' or 'is composed with' certain things. Say it is composed of them. See also include

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