Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1400-1500
Language: French
Origin: compromis, from Latin compromissum 'joint promise', from compromittere, from com- ( COM-) + promittere ( PROMISE2)

compromise

1 noun
     
com‧pro‧mise1
1 [uncountable and countable] an agreement that is achieved after everyone involved accepts less than what they wanted at first, or the act of making this agreement:
Compromise is an inevitable part of marriage.
To stop the argument they decided on a compromise.
compromise with
Fresh attempts at compromise with the legislature were also on the agenda.
compromise between
a compromise between government and opposition
If moderates fail to reach a compromise, the extremists will dominate the agenda.
Be prepared to make compromises.
2 [countable] a solution to a problem in which two things or situations are changed slightly so that they can exist together
compromise between
a happy compromise between the needs of family and work

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