Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: conceivre, from Latin concipere 'to take in, conceive', from com- ( COM-) + capere 'to take'

conceive

verb
     
Related topics: Biology, Birth
con‧ceive
1 [intransitive and transitive] formal to imagine a particular situation or to think about something in a particular way
(cannot) conceive of (doing) something
Many people can't conceive of a dinner without meat or fish.
conceive that
He could not conceive that anything really serious could be worrying his friend.
conceive what/why/how etc
I can hardly conceive what it must be like here in winter.
conceive of something/somebody as something
Language may be conceived of as a process which arises from social interaction.
2 [transitive] to think of a new idea, plan etc and develop it in your mind:
Scientists first conceived the idea of the atomic bomb in the 1930's.
3 [intransitive and transitive]MB to become pregnant:
fertility treatment for women who have difficulty conceiving

Dictionary pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
What is the word for picture 1? What is the word for picture 2? What is the word for picture 3? What is the word for picture 4?
Click on any of the pictures above to find out what it is called.

Explore our topic dictionary