Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Latin
Origin: concludere 'to shut up, end, decide', from com- ( COM-) + claudere 'to shut'

conclude

verb
     
con‧clude S3 W2
1 [transitive] to decide that something is true after considering all the information you have [↪ conclusion]
conclude that
The report concluded that the school should be closed immediately.
conclude from something that
Richardson concluded from his studies that equality between the sexes is still a long way off.
2 [transitive] formal to complete something you have been doing, especially for a long time:
When the investigation is concluded, the results will be sent to the US Attorney's office.
Francis, having concluded his business with James, left for Miami.
3 [intransitive and transitive] to end something such as a meeting, book, event, or speech by doing or saying one final thing
conclude with
Each chapter concludes with a short summary.
conclude by doing something
She concluded by saying she was proud to be from Salford.
To conclude, I'd like to express my thanks to my family.
'So now', she concluded, 'I'm trying to bring some order to the garden.'
4

conclude an agreement/treaty/contract etc

to finish arranging an agreement etc successfully:
That same year, France concluded a trading agreement with Spain.

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