Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1500-1600
Language: French
Origin: confronter 'to have a border with, confront', from Medieval Latin, from Latin com- ( COM-) + frons ( FRONT1)

confront

verb
     
con‧front [transitive]
1 if a problem, difficulty etc confronts you, it appears and needs to be dealt with:
The problems confronting the new government were enormous.
be confronted with something
Customers are confronted with a bewildering amount of choice.
2 to deal with something very difficult or unpleasant in a brave and determined way:
We try to help people confront their problems.
3 to face someone in a threatening way, as though you are going to attack them:
Troops were confronted by an angry mob.
4 to accuse someone of doing something, especially by showing them the proof
confront somebody with/about something
I confronted him with my suspicions, and he admitted everything.
I haven't confronted her about it yet.

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