English version

consternation

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishconsternationcon‧ster‧na‧tion /ˌkɒnstəˈneɪʃən $ ˌkɑːnstər-/ noun [uncountable]  SHOCKa feeling of worry, shock, or fear syn alarm The government’s plans have caused considerable consternation among many Americans. A new power station is being built much to the consternation of environmental groups (=they are very worried about it).in consternation He looked at her in consternation.
Examples from the Corpus
consternationThe arrival of this bonny bawling boy had caused considerable consternation.It had been a moment of enlightenment for him, but one which also caused him considerable consternation.To my consternation, I found the taxi was empty.President Cristiani expressed profound consternation at the deaths of the two journalists.Flora recollected Irena's consternation with satisfaction and Felicity Green's irritation with glee.That caused some consternation and I don't think the same person deputized again.There Taylor played after work, on holidays-and on Sundays, at first much to the consternation of the neighborhood.To the consternation of his cabinet colleagues, he is currently conducting a wide-ranging review of public spending.When the first order announcing Pétain's appointment was received by his staff, there was consternation at Noailles.much to the consternation ofThere Taylor played after work, on holidays-and on Sundays, at first much to the consternation of the neighborhood.You could be spending a lot of time in serious thought, much to the consternation of those around you.
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