Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1200-1300
Language: Old French
Origin: contenir, from Latin continere 'to hold together, hold in, contain', from com- ( COM-) + tenere 'to hold'

contain

verb
     
Related topics: Maths
con‧tain S2 W1 [transitive]
1

container/place

if something such as a bag, box, or place contains something, that thing is inside it:
The thieves stole a purse containing banknotes.
The museum contains a number of original artworks.
2

writing/speech

if a document, book, speech etc contains something, that thing is included in it:
The letter contained information about Boulestin's legal affairs.
be contained in/within something
The proposed changes are contained in a policy statement.
3

substance

if a substance contains something, that thing is part of it:
This product may contain nuts.
4

control feelings

to control strong feelings of anger, excitement etc:
Jane couldn't contain her amusement any longer.
contain yourself
He was so excited he could hardly contain himself.
5

stop something

to stop something from spreading or escaping:
Doctors are struggling to contain the epidemic.
measures aimed at containing political opposition
self-contained
6

maths

technicalHM to surround an area or an angle:
How big is the angle contained by these two sides?

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