English version

converge

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishconvergecon‧verge /kənˈvɜːdʒ $ -ˈvɜːrdʒ/ ●○○ verb [intransitive]  1 JOIN something TOGETHERto come from different directions and meet at the same point to become one thing opp diverge The two rivers converge into one near Pittsburgh.2 CROWDif groups of people converge in a particular place, they come there from many different places and meet together to form a large crowdconverge on Reporters converged on the scene.3 SAMEif different ideas or aims converge, they become the same opp diverge Cultural beliefs about the role of women converge with government policies.convergent adjective The member states should start to have more convergent policies.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
convergeHere the two distinct theories converge.The River Rhine converges with the Mosel at the city of Koblenz.Traffic is heavy where the two roads converge.The delta is where the rivers converge and flow into the bay.We still held the point where the roads converged at Chancellorsville, but our position promised more for offensive than defensive battle.The borders of Thailand, Laos and Burma all converge at this point.The separate implementations and cross-compilers are to be converged in a new Ada9X.These mountains converge in the high mountainous land to the south called the Vaults.The two groups of demonstrators converged on Hyde Park.About 20,000 motorcyclists will converge on Milwaukee this weekend, to celebrate the 90th birthday of the Harley Davidson bike company.Delorean car enthusiasts from all over the world are set to converge on the province on Thursday for their annual reunion.The principal rivers of the Empire flow from the east to the west, and as they converge they become greater still.Several events converged to make this a pivotal year.Whenever famine strikes, Western public and private relief agencies converge upon it with cargo planes, helicopters and land cruisers.converge onHundreds of hippies converge on Stonehenge to celebrate the summer solstice.
From Longman Business Dictionaryconvergecon‧verge /kənˈvɜːdʒ-ˈvɜːrdʒ/ verb [intransitive]1if two or more rates of interest, unemployment etc converge, they move to the same levelconverge withIrish productivity per worker has converged with the EU norms.2ECONOMICS if two or more economies converge, they start to have the same characteristics such as the same levels of inflation, interest rates etc. The economies of countries wanting to join the EU have to converge with those of existing members before they can joinconverge withBritain’s economy has not yet converged sufficiently with those of the present participants in the euromarket. compare divergeconvergent adjectiveThe Asian crisis showed the convergent, rather than divergent, nature of emerging economies.convergence noun [uncountable]employment policies that work against regional convergence→ See Verb table
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Verb table
converge
Simple Form
Present
I, you, we, theyconverge
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyconverged
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Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave converged
he, she, ithas converged
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad converged
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill converge
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have converged
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Continuous Form
Present
Iam converging
he, she, itis converging
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you, we, theyare converging
Past
I, he, she, itwas converging
you, we, theywere converging
Present perfect
I, you, we, theyhave been converging
he, she, ithas been converging
Past perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theyhad been converging
Future
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill be converging
Future perfect
I, you, he, she, it, we, theywill have been converging
> View Less