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Date: 1300-1400
Language: Old French
Origin: conveier 'to go with someone to a place', from Vulgar Latin conviare, from Latin com- ( COM-) + via 'way'

convey

verb
     
Related topics: Law
con‧vey [transitive]
1 to communicate or express something, with or without using words:
All this information can be conveyed in a simple diagram.
Ads convey the message that thin is beautiful.
He was sent to convey a message to the U.N. Secretary General.
convey something to somebody
I want to convey to children that reading is one of life's greatest treats.
convey a sense/an impression/an idea etc
You don't want to convey the impression that there's anything illegal going on.
2 formal to take or carry something from one place to another:
Your luggage will be conveyed to the hotel by taxi.
3SCL law to legally change the possession of property from one person to another

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