English version


From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishcorrespondentcor‧re‧spon‧dent /ˌkɒrəˈspɒndənt $ ˌkɔːrəˈspɑːn-, ˌkɑː-/ ●○○ noun [countable]  1 TCNBOsomeone who is employed by a newspaper or a television station etc to report news from a particular area or on a particular subjectreporterpolitical/foreign/legal etc correspondent the political correspondent for ‘The Times’ Our correspondent in South Africa sent this report.2 TCMWRITEsomeone who writes letters I’m not a very good correspondent, I’m afraid.COLLOCATIONSADJECTIVES/NOUN + correspondenta foreign correspondent (=reporting on other countries)He became a top BBC foreign correspondent.our Beijing/Cairo/Washington etc correspondent (=sending reports from a particular place – used by a newspaper or TV station)This report comes direct from our Tel Aviv correspondent.a political correspondentAs our political correspondent wrote last week, this decision is welcome.a newspaper correspondentDuring the war he was employed as a newspaper correspondent.a war correspondentBeing a war correspondent is a dangerous job.an education/health/sports etc correspondentHere is our sports correspondent with all the details.a special correspondent (=one with a special area of responsibility)He was a special correspondent for animals and the environment.
Examples from the Corpus
correspondentSo it was that her charisma and undoubted beauty helped to make her the first lady air correspondent in the world.He left his local paper to become the Daily Telegraph's defence correspondent."Schools in Crisis", by our education correspondent Nick Bacon.He joined ABC as its chief foreign correspondent in 2000.a White House correspondentSuch was the invitation which the newspaper correspondents received on the morning of August 1,1861.She was a reporter with the City Press, and an occasional correspondent for the Star - a radical national daily.He fell in love with it; a lot of correspondents did.We now go over to our correspondent in Lisbon for a report on the election.The bulletin includes articles from other publications as well as those written by its own correspondents throughout the region.This report from our political correspondent, Fiona Ross.Foreign publications have been criticised for alleged one-sided reporting and their correspondents have been denied visas.Martin Bell worked for many years as the BBC's war correspondent, covering conflicts all over the world.He has been a reporter, Washington correspondent, system editor, state editor and Baltimore County bureau chief.political/foreign/legal etc correspondentIt was all preparation for her dream job: a foreign correspondent, roaming the world in a trench coat.Because they tell truths and provide insights beyond the reach of foreign correspondents angling for knighthoods and Pulitzer Prizes.It's an analysis piece by our political correspondent, Mattie Storin.This report from our political correspondent, Fiona Ross.Our political correspondent Fiona Ross is at Westminster and she joins us live.Government officials failed also in another hide-and-seek game with foreign correspondents.
From Longman Business Dictionarycorrespondentcor‧re‧spon‧dent /ˌkɒrəˈspɒndəntˌkɔːrəˈspɑːn-, ˌkɑː-/ noun [countable]1British English a person or organization, especially one in a foreign country, that you regularly do business withAmong a wide circle of friends and correspondents, Cayley seems to have been recognized as a generous and modest man.2BANKING (also correspondent bank) a bank in one country that acts for a bank in another countryBanks, by overseas representation and correspondents, are able to provide advice on economic, financial and commercial conditions in other countries.Instructions are sent by airmail to a correspondent bank requesting it to credit the exporter or his bank with an appropriate amount in the exporter’s domestic currency.
Pictures of the day
Do you know what each of these is called?
Click on the pictures to check.