Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English homepage

Date: 1600-1700
Language: Medieval Latin
Origin: , past participle of cultivare, from cultivus 'used for crops', from Latin cultus, past participle of colere 'to cultivate'

cultivate

verb
     
Related topics: Gardening, Plants, Agriculture, Crops
cul‧ti‧vate [transitive]
1TAC to prepare and use land for growing crops and plants:
The land was too rocky to cultivate.
2 formal to plant and take care of a particular crop [= grow]:
We cultivated maize and watermelons.
3 to work hard to develop a particular skill, attitude, or quality:
Try to cultivate a more relaxed and positive approach to life.
The company has been successful in cultivating a very professional image.
4 to make an effort to develop a friendly relationship with someone, especially someone who can help you:
Professor Gladwyn would be an acquaintance worth cultivating.

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