English version

cutback

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishcutbackcut‧back /ˈkʌtbæk/ noun [countable usually plural] 🔊 🔊 REDUCEa reduction in something, such as the number of workers in a company or the amount of money a government or company spends 🔊 The shortage of teachers was blamed on government cutbacks.cutback in 🔊 cutbacks in funding for libraries 🔊 A fall in donations has forced the charity to make cutbacks.sharp/drastic/severe cutback 🔊 sharp cutbacks in the military budget cut back
Examples from the Corpus
cutbackPartners' preferences can also make it more difficult to control household fuel consumption and to effect cutbacks in personal consumption.Armed forces cutbacks in the West have had an effect, too.In this era of funding cutbacks and academic brain drains, one must suspend preconceptions.Although employment growth has been steady since the recession, government cutbacks will likely curb it.With the program cutbacks, the arsenal ship was renamed the maritime fire support demonstrator.If anything the situation is worse, with sharp cutbacks in government investments in education, infrastructure, and research.cutback inLansbury's new contract includes a cutback in her workload.
From Longman Business Dictionarycutbackcut‧back /ˈkʌtbæk/ noun [countable usually plural] a reduction in something, such as the number of workers in a company or the amount of money a company or government spendsFinancial cutbacks have led to a decline in the number of staff attending overseas conferences.If GM, Ford and Chrysler start to lose market share, we could see production cutbacks and job losses that could hurt the U.S. economy.The shortage of teachers was blamed on government cutbacks.
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