English version

demean

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishdemeande‧mean /dɪˈmiːn/ verb [transitive]  DOWNto do something that makes people lose respect for someone or somethingdegrade language that demeans womendemean yourself (by doing something) I wouldn’t demean myself by begging him for a job.→ See Verb table
Examples from the Corpus
demeanThe psychological effects of being told what to eat can also be demeaning.They are onerous and omnipresent, useless and demeaning.They think that gearing a campaign towards maximum effective coverage is demeaning.There is nothing demeaning about cleaning in the food industry.This whole extravaganza is demeaning, debasing and deeply damaging to what should be serious political discourse, the protesters complain.The country was noisy with fools who demeaned his anger.Students should not demean the graduation ceremony with inappropriate behavior.They are reclaiming a heritage, their own heritage, which has been historically demeaned through cartoon characters and national stereotypes.demean yourself (by doing something)I own I have demeaned myself but it was only to try you.Is it to be wondered at that I demean myself thus to take notice of her?You have taught me to forget myself by demeaning yourself to be free to a poor servant.
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Verb table
demean
Simple Form
Present
itdemeans
itdemeaned
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Present perfect
ithas demeaned
Past perfect
ithad demeaned
Future
itwill demean
Future perfect
itwill have demeaned
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Continuous Form
Present
itis demeaning
itwas demeaning
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Present perfect
ithas been demeaning
Past perfect
ithad been demeaning
Future
itwill be demeaning
Future perfect
itwill have been demeaning
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